Enlightened
Business Concepts


A Non-Mystical Derivative of
The Science of Getting Rich,
by Wallace D. Wattles


The Scionics Institute

The Right to Be Rich

There are Principles WhichGovern the Attainment of Wealth

Is Opportunity Monopolized?

The Necessity for Truth and Self-Honesty

The Ethics of Wealth Accumulation

Vision, Thought, and Efficient Action

The Advancing Person

Enlightened
Business Concepts


A Non-Mystical Derivative of
The Science of Getting Rich,
by Wallace D. Wattles

Enlightened Business Concepts is a practical manual, intended for those who acknowledge their own personal need for wealth. It contains powerful concepts which, if intellectually and psychologically integrated, will naturally propel a person towards the achievement of financial wealth. It is for those who want results and are willing to take the conclusions of science as a basis for action. The plan of action contained herein derives directly from observational evidence. It has been thoroughly tested and validated by practical experiment – in other words, it works.

[NOTE: This book, created by the Scionics Institute, draws directly upon material contained in the 1910 classic, The Science of Getting Rich, by Wallace D. Wattles. It is not, however, merely a re-editing of Wattles' book, which contained both valuable, reality-based concepts, and also a number of false, mystical concepts; these latter, if taken and carried out literally, would lead the reader to value-destruction rather than value-creation, to poverty rather than wealth, and to failure rather than success. The volume before you retains the general format of Wattles' original book, and even many of the original words; critically, however, all mysticisms and falsities have been completely stripped away and replaced by wealth-generating, empiricorational facts, in the form of, literally, “enlightened business concepts.”]

The Right to Be Rich

Whatever may be said in praise of poverty, the fact remains that it is not possible to live a really complete or successful life unless one has a significant degree of financial wealth. To rise to one’s greatest possible level of fulfillment, to unfold one’s potential and to develop one’s talents, one must have many things to use, and one cannot normally acquire these things unless one has sufficient money to buy them with.

The object of all life is development and growth, and all healthy living things naturally seek all the development and growth that they are capable of attaining. For human beings, to live a truly healthy life requires the free and unrestricted use of all things which are necessary to attain one’s fullest mental, physical, and emotional development.

It is sometimes asserted that to be wealthy means merely to be satisfied or contented with little, but this is not the case. In this book, therefore, such words as “wealth” or “riches” will not be used in a figurative way. No one ought to be satisfied with a little if one is capable of using and enjoying more. Advancement and growth is the natural object of all life, and everyone should strive for all that can contribute to the elegance, beauty, power, and richness of life. To be content with less is a violation against the natural object of life, and one’s own nature.

One is truly wealthy when one owns all that one desires in order to live life to the fullest, and money is the primary means by which one may obtain desirable things. Life has advanced so far and become so complex, and the possibilities for personal growth have become so vast, that even the most ordinary person requires a great deal of wealth to explore these possibilities to a degree which even approaches completeness. Every individual naturally wants to become all that he or she is capable of becoming. This desire to realize innate possibilities is inherent in human nature; one cannot help wanting to become all that one can be. Success in life is a matter of becoming all that one is capable of becoming, and this is only possible by making use of things. One can have the free use of things only as one becomes wealthy enough to buy them.

There is nothing wrong with wanting to be wealthy. The desire for wealth is really the desire for a richer, fuller and more abundant life – and that desire is praiseworthy and healthy. The person who does not desire to live more abundantly is abnormal, and so the person who does not desire to have wealth enough to buy all that he or she wants is abnormal.

Human beings live for physical, mental, and emotional fulfillment; all three are desirable, and none of these three can be fully realized if one or both of the others are not also fully realized. We are all acquainted with the loathsome consequences of living only for the body and neglecting mental and emotional needs, and we see that complete fulfillment is only attained by means of the complete expression of all that a person can give forth physically, mentally and emotionally. It is not right or desirable to live only for one and to deny the others.

One cannot live fully in body without good food, comfortable clothing, and warm shelter, and without freedom from excessive toil or illness. Rest, recreation and health are necessary to one’s physical life and fulfillment.

One cannot live fully in mind without good books and time to study them, without opportunity for travel and observation, or without intellectual companionship. Intellectual recreations, and all the objects of art and beauty which one is capable of appreciating are necessary to one’s mental life and fulfillment.

One cannot live fully in emotion if one does not have love, and love is denied the fullest expression to one in poverty. One’s highest happiness is found in the bestowal of benefits upon those one loves; love finds its most natural and spontaneous expression in giving. One who has nothing to give cannot fulfill one’s role as a spouse or parent, as a citizen, or as a human being. It is in the use of material things that one find full life for one’s body, mind, and emotion. Because it is by mean of money that one acquires these material things, it is of utmost importance that one has sufficient money – that is to say, that one is rich.

It is perfectly normal, healthy, and right that one should desire to be rich. It is perfectly right that one should put one’s fullest effort into learning the principles of attaining wealth, as wealth is the foundation upon which all other fulfillment is built.

There are Principles Which
Govern the Attainment of Wealth

The ownership of money and property comes as a result of doing things in a certain way, and those who do things in this certain way – whether on purpose or by accident – become wealthy. It is a natural law that like causes produce like effects, and therefore, anyone who learns and properly applies the principles by which wealth is acquired is also certain to become wealthy.

The infallibility of getting rich by doing things in this certain way is show by the following facts:

Getting rich is not a matter of environment, for if it were, everyone living in certain neighborhoods would become wealthy. The people of one city would be rich, while those of other towns would all be poor, or all the inhabitants of one state would be immersed in wealth, while those in another would be in poverty.

In reality, however, one sees rich and poor living side-by-side, in the same environment, and often engaged in the same vocations. When two people are in the same locality and in the same business, and one gets rich while the other remains poor, it shows that getting rich is certainly not primarily a matter of environment. Some environments may be more favorable than others, but when two people in the same business are in the same neighborhood and one gets rich while the other fails, it indicates that getting rich is the result of doing things in a certain way.

Furthermore, the ability to do things in this certain way is not due solely to the possession of talent, for many people who have great talent remain poor, while others who have very little talent achieve great wealth.

Studying those individuals who have gotten rich, one finds that they are an average lot in all respects, having no greater talents or abilities than other people have. It is evident that they do not get rich because they possess unique talents and abilities which are not possessed by others, but that they do things in a certain way.

Getting rich is not merely the result of saving, or thrift. Many very penurious individuals are poor, while free spenders often become wealthy.

Nor, generally speaking, is getting rich due to doing things which others fail to do, for two people in the same business often do almost exactly the same things, and one gets rich while the other remains poor or becomes bankrupt.

From all of these things, it is obvious that getting rich is the result of doing things in a certain way. Furthermore, if getting rich is the result of doing things in a certain way, and if like causes always produce like effects, then anyone who does things in that same certain way is sure to become rich, and the matter of attaining wealth is brought within the domain of an exact science.

The question may arise as to whether this certain way may be so difficult that only a few individuals will be able to follow it. As has already been shown, however, getting rich is not a matter of natural ability or talent – both talented and untalented individuals get rich; both physically strong and physically weak or sickly people get rich. Some degree of ability to think and understand is, of course, essential, but inasmuch as natural ability is concerned, anyone who can read and understand these words can certainly get rich.

Also, we have seen that it is not a matter of environment. Of course, location does count for something, because getting rich involves dealing with people and of being where there are people to deal with; with the ever-increasing expansion of worldwide, instantaneous communication, however; location is becoming an ever-diminishing factor in the attainment of wealth.

Again, it is not a matter of choosing some particular business or profession. Individuals get rich in every business and in every profession, while their next-door neighbors in the very same profession remain in poverty.

It is true that one will do best in a business which one likes and finds to be congenial to oneself. And if one has certain talents which are well developed, one will do best in a business which calls for the exercise of those talents, although this is certainly not a requirement, as has already be shown.

Aside from these general limitations, however, getting rich is not dependent upon engaging is some particular business, in some particular location, but rather is dependent upon doing things in some certain way. If one is now engaged in some business and anyone else in one’s locality is getting rich in the same business, while one is not getting rich oneself, it is simply because one is not doing things in the same certain way that the other person is doing them.

No one is prevented from getting rich by lack of capital. Although the further increase in wealth becomes faster and easier with the increase in capital, no matter how poor one may be, if one begins to do things in the certain, wealth-generating way, one will certainly get rich and acquire all the capital one needs. The acquisition of capital is a part of the process of getting rich and it is a part of the result which invariably follows from doing things in the certain, wealth-generating way.

One may be in abject poverty and deeply in debt. One may have neither friends, nor influence, nor resources, but if one begins to do things in this certain way, one must infallibly begin to get rich, for like causes always produce like effects. If one has no capital, one can get capital. If one is in the wrong business, one can get into the right business. If one is in the wrong location, one can go to the right location.

Most importantly, one can do so by beginning – in one’s present business and in one’s present location – to do things in the certain way which always causes success. This certain way involves living in harmony with the natural laws which govern the universe.

Is Opportunity Monopolized?

No one is kept poor because other people have monopolized the wealth and put a fence around it. One may be shut off from engaging in business in certain lines, but there are always other channels of opportunity open.

At different periods the tide of opportunity rises and falls in different directions, according to the needs of society and the particular stage of social evolution which has been reached. There is an abundance of opportunity for one who will flow with this tide, rather than attempting to swim against it.

Thus it is that workers, either individually or as a class, are not deprived of opportunity. The workers are not “kept down” by their masters; they are not being “ground” by the trust or by big business. They are where they are, both individually and as a class, because they do not do things in a certain way.

A working class individual may become a master class individual whenever he or she begins to do things in a certain way. The principles of wealth accumulation are the same for all individuals. The individual worker is not held down by an entire class’s ignorance of these principles; he or she can follow the tide of opportunity to riches, and this book will explain exactly how.

Nature is such an enormously rich supply of wealth that the individual who follows the certain way outlined in this book will be able to profitably tap into that supply for as long as humankind exists. No one, therefore, is poor because nature is poor, or because there is not enough to go around. One who is guided by the principles outlined in this writing will surely and triumphantly advance in the quest for wealth and success.

The Necessity for Truth and Self-Honesty


One gets rich by doing things in a certain way. One’s way of doing things is the direct result of the way one thinks about things. In order for one to do things in the way one wants to do them, one will have to acquire the ability to think in a certain way. This is the first step toward getting rich.

And what one should strive to think is truth, regardless of immediate appearances. To think truth is to think thoughts which are true, that is, to think thoughts which accurately correspond with actual reality, as opposed to thoughts which merely reflect immediate appearances.

Everyone has the natural and inherent power to think truth, but it requires more effort to do so than it does to think those thoughts which are suggested by immediate appearances. To think according to immediate appearances is easy; to think truth regardless of immediate appearances is laborious, and is a form of labor from which most people retreat.

The ability to think truth regardless of immediate appearance begins with always being honest with oneself in all things – no matter what. This is of paramount importance; without a loyalty to constant and complete self-honesty this book will be of no use to the reader, but with such a loyalty this book will be a valuable and certain guide to the attainment of wealth and personal success.

While constant and complete self-honesty is necessary, this is not quite fully sufficient as a means for thinking truth. Because of the inherently limited nature of human perceptual and reasoning abilities, it is necessary for humans to occasionally re-evaluate beliefs which may unknowingly be based upon erroneous perceptions or reasoning. Such an approach is akin to the so-called “scientific method.” While this requires some degree of effort, the person who acquires this habit cannot be deceived for long, but will ultimately see through immediate appearances, to perceive the truth which is hidden from others.

This chapter will end with a summary or syllabus thereof, and this syllabus contains the first two principles of wealth accumulation:

Enlightened Business Concepts (1-2 of 6)

  1. One should strive to think TRUTH, regardless of immediate appearances, by ALWAYS being HONEST with oneself – NO MATTER WHAT.

  2. One is best able to think TRUTH, regardless of immediate appearances, when one has acquired the habit of honestly and critically re-evaluating previously accepted beliefs whenever necessary.

The Ethics of Wealth Accumulation

Every living thing must continually seek for the enlargement of its life, because life, in the mere act of living, must increase itself or begin to perish.

A seed, dropped into the ground, springs into activity, and in the act of living produces hundreds of more seeds; life, by living, multiplies itself. It is forever becoming more. It must do so, if it continues to be at all.

Intelligence is under this same necessity for continuous increase. Every thought one thinks makes it necessary for one to think another thought; consciousness is continually expanding. Every fact one learns leads one to the learning of another fact; knowledge is continually increasing. Every talent one cultivates brings to the mind the desire to cultivate another talent; one is subject to the urge of life, seeking expression, which drives one on to know more, to do more, and to be more.

In order to know more, do more, and be more, one must have more. One must have things to use, for one learns, and one does, and one becomes only by using things. To become rich is necessary to the goal of acquiring the things which one needs to use for learning, doing, and becoming.

The desire for wealth is simply a natural and healthy manifestation of the capacity for humans to seek greater fulfillment and growth. The seeking of growth and fulfillment is common to all living things. That which causes one to want more money is the same as that which causes a plant to grow; it is life seeking fuller expression.

Life requires the performance of the functions of life, and one really only lives when one performs every function of which one is capable, without excess in any and without deficiency in any.

One should not seek to get rich in order to live swinishly or gluttonously, because the mere gratification of animal desires is not a healthy and fulfilling life for a human being. But the performance of every physical function is a part of life, and no one lives completely who denies the impulses of the body to have a normal and healthful expression.

One should not seek to get rich solely to enjoy mental pleasures, to get knowledge, or to gratify ambition. While all of these are a legitimate part of life, anyone who lives for the pleasures of the intellect alone will have only a partial and not fully satisfying life.

One should not seek to get rich solely for the good of others, to lose oneself for the salvation of others through philanthropy and self-sacrifice. One is not a sacrificial animal, of lesser value than those around oneself; one’s own well-being is just as important as those of others – and one’s own well-being is actually one’s primary responsibility. One helps society best when one helps oneself, by being an example of success which others can follow, rather than by merely giving away all that one has earned for oneself.

One should seek to get rich in order to live a really full and complete life; in order to eat drink and be merry when it is time to do these things; in order to surround oneself with beautiful things, see distant lands, feed one’s mind, and develop one’s intellect; and in order to love others and do kind things, and to be able to play a good part in helping the world to find truth and happiness.

One can help others more by making the most of oneself than in any other way. One can make the most of oneself only by getting rich, so it is right and praiseworthy that one should give one’s first and best thought to the work of acquiring wealth.

There is a common idea in the realms of business and economics that to succeed requires success at cutthroat competition, but this is not the case. It is certainly true that there is an element of competition in practically all business situations, and it is also true that economics is the scientific study of decision-making as it pertains to situations of limited resources. However, one’s focus in the realm of value creation and value production should be just that: value creation and value production, rather than value competition. While some level of competition will be unavoidable in the quest for wealth, in general, if the primary focus of one’s efforts is upon the creative production of values rather than merely upon the competition for values the result will be that one will accumulate wealth so quickly that it will almost seem that one has no competitive rivals at all as one accumulates riches for oneself.

In terms of one’s business and personal ethics, one must therefore not keep one’s thoughts primarily focused on competition, but should focus on creating rather than competing for what is already created. One never should and never has to steal anything away from anyone. One does not have to drive “sharp” bargains that are ultimately unfair to others, and one does not have to cheat or take advantage of anyone. One should never let anyone work for less than he or she earns.

To say that one does not have to drive “sharp” bargains, is not to mean that one never has to drive any bargains at all or that one is above the necessity for having any dealings with one’s fellow human beings. What is meant is that one will not need to deal with them unfairly. One does not have to get something for nothing, but can give to every person more than one takes from them.

One cannot give everyone more in cash market value than one takes, but one can give everyone more in use value than the cash value of the thing which one receives. The paper, ink, and other material in this book may not be worth the money which one has paid for this book, for example, but if the ideas suggested by it bring one great wealth (as they surely will if one follows the instructions herein) then you have certainly not been wronged by those who sold it to you. One will have received a tremendous use value for a small cash value.

Imagine that one owns an inexpensive computer. One takes it to some very undeveloped part of the world, without electricity, and by “salesmanship” induces a native dweller to trade a bundle of furs worth $1000 for the computer, by telling him about all of the wonderful things which the computer can accomplish. In such a case, one would have wronged the native, for he has no real use for the computer in the absence of electricity. It has no use value to the native; it will not add to his or her life.

But if one had traded, instead, a gun of a value approximately equal to the computer for the furs, then the native has made a good bargain. The native will have use for the gun. It will help to procure many more furs and much food; it will add to the native’s life in every way. It will make him or her rich. And, of course, such a deal will also be profitable for oneself, as the furs one has received have many times the cash value of the gun.

When one rises from competitive value acquisition to creative value production, one can scan one’s business transactions very strictly, and if one is selling anything to any person which does not add more to the customer’s life than the thing one receives in exchange, one can afford to stop it. One does not have to “beat” anybody in business. And if one is in a business which does, by nature, “beat” people, one should get out of it at once.

One should always give everyone more in use value than one receives in cash value. Then one is adding to the life of the world by every business transaction, and through these “win-win” dynamics one’s accumulation of wealth will accelerate as others see the value of dealing with one.

If one has people working for oneself, one must take from them more in cash value than they are being paid in wages, but one can and should so organize one’s business that it will be filled with the principle of advancement, and so that each employee who wishes to do so may advance a little every day. In addition, employers can often provide employees with benefits which have a greater use value to the employee than the cash value cost to the employer, e.g., such as the restaurant owner who gives employees free or discounted meals, or the hotel owner who allows employees to use the hotel pool.

One can make one’s business do for one’s employees what this book is doing for the reader. An employer can conduct one’s business in such a manner that it will act as a sort of ladder by which every employee who will make the honest effort may also climb to riches while the employee is also generating riches for the employer.

In such a manner, one will get what one desires, but in such a way that when one gets it every other person whom one affects will also have more than he or she has now; as stated earlier, these “win-win” dynamics will ultimately lead one to an accelerated accumulation of wealth, as others see the value of dealing with one. This is reflected by adding a third statement to the syllabus:

Enlightened Business Concepts (1-3 of 6)

  1. One should strive to think TRUTH, regardless of immediate appearances, by ALWAYS being HONEST with oneself – NO MATTER WHAT.

  2. One is best able to think TRUTH, regardless of immediate appearances, when one has acquired the habit of honestly and critically re-evaluating previously accepted beliefs whenever necessary.

  3. One should always give others more in use value than one receives in cash value, so that every other person whom one affects will have more than he or she has now; in this way, one will experience an ever-accelerating accumulation of wealth, as others come to recognize the valuable “win-win” dynamics of dealing with one.

Vision, Thought, and Efficient Action

It is not enough for one to merely know that one wishes to achieve wealth or riches. Everyone has that idea. Instead, one should form a very clear and definite mental picture, or “vision,” of exactly what it is that one desires in terms of achieving one’s goal of success, as well as a very clear and definite mental vision of the steps required to attain these desires. Many people fail to attain their desires because they have only a vague or misty concept of the things they want to do, to have, or to become, or because they have only a vague or misty concept of the steps required to attain their desires.

One must know what one wants and be specific and definite. One can never get rich by focusing one’s creative powers upon unformed longings or vague desires. Of course, it is not possible to foresee each and every obstacle or problem that one must overcome or solve to achieve one’s desires. The more clear and definite one makes one’s vision of success, however, and the more one dwells upon it, fleshing out the details over time, and bringing the whole vision into ever-greater focus and ever-sharper detail, the more one will be prepared to meet and overcome whatever obstacles do arise. Furthermore, the more one has actual, real-world practice and experience in successfully dealing with such obstacles and problems, the more easily and successfully will one be able to deal with obstacles and problems which may arise in the future.

While forming a clear and definite vision of one’s goals and the steps required to achieve these goals are of great importance, thought alone is impotent without the proper action. It is not enough to visualize and know the steps one must take to reach one’s goals if one never personally takes these steps. This is the rock upon which many would-be value creators meet shipwreck – the failure to connect thought with personal action.

At every waking moment, then, it is necessary both to think truth in relation to value-creation and, wherever possible, to instantly act upon that truth. One must be ever-vigilant in one’s quest to create values and must be ever-ready to take the actions required to actually go about creating them. Whatever one’s action is to be, it is evident that one must act NOW, when the action is to actually be performed. One cannot act in the past – the past is gone, never to return. While there is nothing wrong with planning future actions to take advantage of future opportunities, one should use the present to take advantage of the opportunities of the present; however, to wait to act until the future to take advantage of the opportunities which are available now, is to waste both the present and the future. The future should be a time to build upon actions already accomplished, rather than a time for “catching up” on the things that should already be done. Thus, at every moment, one should do NOW what one can do NOW.

One must not lose oneself in dreams or fantasies of future wealth and success, but should actively pursue these goals in the present. This active pursuit must take place in one’s present place and time, with one doing ALL that one can do towards achieving one’s goals.

One can advance only by being larger than one’s present place, and no one is larger than one’s present place who leaves undone any of the work pertaining to that place. The world is advanced only by those who more than fill their present place.

If no one quite filled his or her present place, then society as a whole would be in regression rather than advance. Those who do not quite fill their present places are a dead weight upon society, government, commerce, and industry. They must be carried along by others, rather than advancing by their own efforts, under their own power. The progress of the world is slowed by those who do not fill the places they are holding; their tendency is towards degeneration rather than advance. No society could advance if everyone was smaller than his or her place.

Every day is either a successful day or a day of failure, and it is the successful days which get one what one wants. If every day were a failure then one could never get rich, while if every day were a success, one could not fail to get rich.

If there is something that may be done today and one does not do it, then one has failed as far as that thing is concerned – and the consequences may be more disastrous than seems immediately apparent. This is because every action successfully completed may be viewed as another completed step along the path to even greater success, and are thus a prerequisite to attaining the greater success; furthermore, opportunities for great advance frequently present themselves unexpectedly, and often one will only be in a position to take advantage of such unexpected opportunities if certain other action have already been accomplished. Much may depend upon one’s performing some simple act of advance, and it may be the very thing that is to open the door of opportunity to very great possibilities. One’s neglect or failure to do some small thing now may thus cause a long delay in achieving one’s ultimate goals.

Do, every day, ALL that can be done that day.

There is, however, a limitation or qualification of the above that one must take into account. One is not to overwork, nor is one to rush blindly into one’s business in the effort to do the greatest possible number of things in the shortest possible time. It is not necessarily the number of things which one does, but the EFFICIENCY of each separate action that counts.

One needs a certain amount of rest and relaxation, without which one would soon become overworked and exhausted, and would then be unable to operate at peak efficiency. This is physically, mentally, and emotionally unhealthy, and thus it is one’s responsibility to use the time required for rest and relaxation just as efficiently as the time one spends in work. This means using such time in ways that actually result in one’s being refreshed and recharged, so that upon returning to work one will again be at peak efficiency.

Every action is, in itself, either effective or ineffective, either a success or a failure. Every action is, in itself, either efficient or inefficient. Every inefficient action is a failure, and if one spends one life in performing inefficient actions, one’s whole life will be a failure. The more things one does, the worse it will be – if all one’s actions are inefficient ones.

On the other hand, every efficient action is a success in itself, and if every action of one’s life is an efficient one, one’s whole life must be a success.

The cause of failure is doing too many things in an inefficient manner and not doing enough things in an efficient manner.

If one does not perform any inefficient actions, and one performs a sufficient number of efficient actions, one will become rich. If, now, it is possible for one to make each action an efficient action, then the whole matter of attaining wealth or success becomes an exact science. Every action can be made most effective and efficient by applying one’s full determination to the performance of the action, while firmly maintaining one’s vision of the goal of the immediate action under consideration, and the manner in which this immediate action contributes to the larger vision of one’s greater, long-term goal of wealth and success.

Our syllabus will now be repeated, with the addition of two more statements:

Enlightened Business Concepts (1-5 of 6)

  1. One should strive to think TRUTH, regardless of immediate appearances, by ALWAYS being HONEST with oneself – NO MATTER WHAT.

  2. One is best able to think TRUTH, regardless of immediate appearances, when one has acquired the habit of honestly and critically re-evaluating previously accepted beliefs whenever necessary.

  3. One should always give others more in use value than one receives in cash value, so that every other person whom one affects will have more than he or she has now; in this way, one will experience an ever-accelerating accumulation of wealth, as others come to recognize the valuable “win-win” dynamics of dealing with one.

  4. One should form a very clear and definite vision of one’s goal of success, as well as a very clear and definite mental vision of the steps required to attain these desires.

  5. One should do every day, at every moment, ALL that can be done that day and at that moment, and perform every action in an efficient manner, with full determination, in accordance with one’s overall vision of success.

The Advancing Person

Success, in any particular business, depends in part upon one’s possessing, in a well-developed state, the faculties required in that business.

Without good musical faculty no one can succeed as a teacher of music. Without well-developed mechanical faculties no one can achieve great success in any of the mechanical trades. Without tact and the commercial faculties no one can succeed in mercantile pursuits. But to possess in a well-developed state the faculties required for one’s particular vocation does not insure getting rich. There are musicians who have remarkable talent, and who yet remain poor. The are mechanics, carpenters, and so on, who have excellent mechanical ability, but who do not get rich. And there are merchants with good faculties for dealing with people who nevertheless fail.

The different faculties are tools. It is essential to have good tools, but it is also essential that the tools should be used in the right way. One man can take a sharp saw, a square, a good plane, and so on, and build a handsome article of furniture. Another man can take the same tools and set to work to duplicate the article, but his production will be a botch, if he does not know how to use good tools in a successful way.

The various faculties of the mind are the tools by which one must do the work which is to make one rich and successful. So it will easier for one to succeed if one gets into a business for which one is well equipped with mental tools.

Generally speaking, one will do best in those business endeavors which require the use of one’s strongest faculties, i.e., those businesses for which one is naturally “best fitted.” But there are limitations to this statement also. No one should regard his or her vocation as being irrevocably fixed by the tendencies with which he or she is born.

One can get rich in ANY business, provided that one can develop the talent necessary for that business, if one does not already possess the required talent. It merely means that one will have to make one’s tools as one goes along, instead of confining oneself to the use of those tools with which one was born. It would be easier for one to succeed in a vocation for which one already has the required talents in a well-developed state, but one can succeed in any vocation for which one can develop the talents. One advances as a person as one develops new talents and skills.

One will get rich most easily, in terms of effort, if one does that for which one is best fitted, but one will get rich most satisfactorily if one does that which one most wants to do. Doing what one wants to do in life is a source of happiness and satisfaction, and there is no real satisfaction in living if one is forever compelled to be doing things that one does not want to do.

All other things being equal, it is best to select the business for which one has the best-developed talent, but if one has a strong desire to engage in any particular line of work, one should select that work as the ultimate line of work at which one aims, provided one can develop the talent or skills required for that line of work.

One should do what one wants to do, and it is one’s right and privilege to follow the business or avocation which will be most congenial and pleasant. One is not obliged to do things that one does not like to do, and one should not do such things except as a means to bring one to the doing of the things that one wants to do.

Whether one changes one’s vocation or not, one’s actions for the present must largely be those pertaining to the business in which one is now engaged. One can often get into the business that one wants by making constructive use of the business which one is already in. And insofar as any business consists in dealing with other people, the key thought which one must try to convey to others is the impression of increase.

Increase is what all life and all individuals seek. All human activities are based upon the drive for increase. People are seeking more food, more clothes, better shelter, more luxury, more beauty, more knowledge, and more pleasure – always increase in something.

Every living thing is under this necessity for continuous advancement; where increase of life ceases, dissolution and death set in at once.

The normal desire for increased wealth is not an evil or a reprehensible thing. It is simply the desire for a more abundant life. And because it is a fundamental aspect of their nature as living beings, all people are attracted to those who can give them more of the means of life.

It should be noted that the impression of increase is more than merely an “impression,” but is a fact of reality. In following the instructions given in this writing, one will be sure to gain continuous increase in wealth and success for oneself, and will likewise give continuous increase to all with whom one deals. One will become a creative center from which increase is given off to all.

One should be sure of this, and should convey assurance of this fact to every man, woman, and child with whom one comes in contact. No matter how small the transaction, even if it be only the selling of a stick of candy to a little child, one should communicate the impression of increase to the customer.

One should convey the impression of advancement in everything one does, so that all receive the impression that one is an “advancing personality,” and that one likewise advances all who one deals with. Even to those that one meets in a social way – without any thought of business and to whom one is not trying to sell anything – one should convey the impression of increase.

Communicating the impression of increase and advance will naturally cause others to feel that in associating with one that they will gain increase for themselves. One should make sure that this impression is borne out in reality, by always giving more in use value that one receives in cash value. One who takes an honest pride in doing this and lets everyone know it will have no lack of customers.

People will go where they are given increase. If one gives increase of life to others and makes them aware of the fact, one will attract others to oneself and will achieve wealth and success – both in business and in life in general.

Here, then, the syllabus is repeated for the last time, with the one addition of one further statement:

All 6 Enlightened Business Concepts:

  1. One should strive to think TRUTH, regardless of immediate appearances, by ALWAYS being HONEST with oneself – NO MATTER WHAT.

  2. One is best able to think TRUTH, regardless of immediate appearances, when one has acquired the habit of honestly and critically re-evaluating previously accepted beliefs whenever necessary.

  3. One should always give others more in use value than one receives in cash value, so that every other person whom one affects will have more than he or she has now; in this way, one will experience an ever-accelerating accumulation of wealth, as others come to recognize the valuable “win-win” dynamics of dealing with one.

  4. One should form a very clear and definite vision of one’s goal of success, as well as a very clear and definite mental vision of the steps required to attain these desires.

  5. One should do every day, at every moment, ALL that can be done that day and at that moment, and perform every action in an efficient manner, with full determination, in accordance with one’s overall vision of success.

  6. One should convey the impression of increase to all with whom one deals, because if one gives increase to others and makes them aware of the fact, one will attract others to oneself and will achieve wealth and success – both in business and in life.

How to use the Enlightened Business Concepts:

Intellectually and psychologically integrate the concepts above. This will consciously reprogram one's thinking, and naturally propel one towards the achievement of financial wealth.

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One Reply to “AE-DOC: enlightened-business-concepts”

  1. I will do this daily and in each decision and every interaction with others and myself. Thank you very much for all of the information so far in each area I am growing up.

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